Vitamin D Decreases Hepcidin and Inflammatory Markers in Newly Diagnosed Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pediatric Patients- A Prospective Study.

Vitamin D Decreases Hepcidin and Inflammatory Markers in Newly Diagnosed Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pediatric Patients- A Prospective Study.

J Crohns Colitis. 2019 Mar 06;:

Authors: Moran-Lev H, Galai T, Yerushalmy-Feler A, Weisman Y, Anafi A, Deutsch V, Cipok M, Lubetzky R, Cohen S

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The role of hepcidin in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) children with anemia is poorly understood. However, it has been shown that vitamin D suppresses hepcidin expression. We aimed to assess serum hepcidin levels and the effect of vitamin D treatment on those levels in newly diagnosed IBD pediatric patients.
METHODS: Eighty-five children were prospectively recruited in the Dana-Dwek Children’s Hospital (40 newly diagnosed IBD, 45 healthy controls, 47% female, mean age 13.5±3.4 years). Blood samples for interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), hepcidin, iron parameters, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)-D) levels were obtained at baseline. Patients with mild-to-moderate signs and symptoms of IBD were treated with 4000 units of vitamin D daily for two weeks, after which the blood tests were repeated.
RESULTS: Basal hepcidin, IL-6, CRP, and platelets counts were significantly higher, and hemoglobin, serum iron, and transferrin levels were significantly lower in the IBD children compared to controls (p < 0.001). Eighteen patients completed two-week treatment with vitamin D. Following treatment, serum 25-(OH)-D concentrations increased by 40% (from 22.5 to 32.5 ng/ml), and serum hepcidin, CRP, and ferritin levels decreased by 81%, 81%, and 40% (from 33.9 ng/ml to 6.7 ng/ml, from 23.9 mg/l to 4.7 mg/l, and from 27 ng/ml to 16 ng/ml, respectively) (p≤0.001).
CONCLUSION: Serum hepcidin levels were significantly higher in IBD pediatric patients compared to controls. Following vitamin D treatment serum hepcidin concentration decreased significantly. These findings suggest a potential role for vitamin D in treating anemia in IBD children.

PMID: 30840757 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30840757?dopt=Abstract