Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcus in patients with gastrointestinal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease: A prospective cohort study of methods for improving coverage.

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Vaccination for influenza and pneumococcus in patients with gastrointestinal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease: A prospective cohort study of methods for improving coverage.

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2019 Jan;49(1):84-90

Authors: Sitte J, Frentiu E, Baumann C, Rousseau H, May T, Bronowicki JP, Peyrin-Biroulet L, Lopez A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations for high-risk populations are recommended by current guidelines, vaccination coverage is low in patients with gastrointestinal cancer (GC) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
AIM: To evaluate the impact of a specialised infectious disease consultation on vaccination coverage rates in these patients.
METHODS: Between December 2016 and April 2017, all patients with GC or IBD followed in the outpatient clinic of the Gastroenterology department at the Nancy University Hospital enrolled in a 3-phase vaccination programme. Phase 1: Initial questionnaire (vaccination status, knowledge about vaccines and possible barriers to vaccination); Phase 2: Infectious disease consultation; Phase 3: Subsequent questionnaire (evolution of patients’ knowledge about vaccination).
RESULTS: A total of 366 patients were included (GC = 99, IBD = 267). Vaccination rate was 34.7% for influenza and 14.5% for pneumococcus. About 43% of the patients feared side effects of vaccines. After the initial questionnaire, 49.3% of the interested patients participated in a specialised vaccination consultation (n = 102). 87.3% (n = 89) received new vaccination, 41.2% changed their mind about vaccination, and 92.2% would recommend this programme to other patients. Among vaccinated patients, 97.8% (n = 87) received pneumococcal vaccine, 40.4% received tetanus-diphtheria-polio vaccine, and 7.9% received influenza vaccine. In GC patients, anti-pneumococcal vaccination rate was 87.5% after the specialised consultation compared with 10.1% before. In IBD patients, corresponding rates were 85.7% and 16.1%.
CONCLUSIONS: A specialised infectious disease consultation can improve GC and IBD patients’ knowledge about vaccination and vaccination coverage. This approach could be applied to all high-risk populations.

PMID: 30485467 [PubMed – in process]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30485467?dopt=Abstract