The Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Health Care Use in the Manitoba IBD Cohort Study.

The Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Health Care Use in the Manitoba IBD Cohort Study.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019 Mar 23;:

Authors: Witges KM, Bernstein CN, Sexton KA, Afifi T, Walker JR, Nugent Z, Lix LM

Abstract
BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and whether having ACEs was associated with health care utilization post-IBD diagnosis.
METHOD: Three hundred forty-five participants from the population-based Manitoba IBD Cohort Study self-reported ACEs (ie, physical abuse, sexual abuse, death of a very close friend or family member, severe illness or injury, upheaval between parents, and any other experience thought to significantly impacts one’s life or personality) at a median of 5.3 years following IBD diagnosis. Cohort study data were linked to administrative health databases that captured use of hospitals, physician visits, and prescription drugs; use was classified as IBD-related and non-IBD-related. Mean annual estimates of health care use were produced for the 60-month period following the ACE report. Generalized linear models (GLMs) with generalized estimating equations (GEEs) with and without covariate adjustment were fit to the data.
RESULTS: The prevalence of at least 1 ACE was 74.2%. There was no statistically significant association between having experienced an ACE and health care use. However, unadjusted mean annual non-IBD-related general practitioner visits were significantly higher for participants exposed to physical and sexual abuse than those not exposed. Selected adjusted rates of IBD-related health care use were lower for participants who reported exposure to an upheaval between parents and high perceived trauma from ACEs.
CONCLUSION: The estimated prevalence of at least 1 self-reported ACE in persons with diagnosed IBD was high. Health care use among those who experienced ACEs may reflect the impacts of ACE on health care anxiety.

PMID: 30919910 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30919910?dopt=Abstract