Receipt of Preventive Care Services Among US Adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, 2015-2016.

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Receipt of Preventive Care Services Among US Adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, 2015-2016.

Dig Dis Sci. 2019 Feb 12;:

Authors: Xu F, Dahlhamer JM, Terlizzi EP, Wheaton AG, Croft JB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous reports suggest that adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receive suboptimal preventive care.
AIMS: The population-based study compared the receipt of these services by US adults with and without IBD.
METHODS: Adults aged ≥ 18 years with IBD (1.2%) and without IBD were identified from the 2015 and 2016 National Health Interview Survey (n = 66,610). Age-standardized prevalence of doctor visits, receipt of medical advice, and selected preventive care was calculated for adults with and without IBD. The model-adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated for receipt of preventive care associated with IBD.
RESULTS: The prevalence of a doctor visit in the past 12 months was significantly higher among adults with IBD than those without. IBD was also associated with significantly higher prevalence of receiving medical advice about smoking cessation (83.9% vs. 66.4%) and diet (42.9% vs. 32.1%), having colon cancer screening in the past 12 months (44.0% vs. 26.7%), having ever had an HIV test (51.5% vs. 45.4%) or pneumococcal vaccine (75.3% vs. 64.0%), having received a tetanus vaccine in the past 10 years (72.0% vs. 61.8%), and having received a flu vaccine in the past 12 months (48.4% vs. 41.0%), but was not significantly associated with receiving cervical cancer screening and hepatitis A and B vaccines.
CONCLUSIONS: Adults with IBD were more likely to receive many types of preventive care than adults without IBD. The findings can inform healthcare policy makers to make strategic decisions that enhance multidisciplinary coordination from various medical specialties to ensure optimal preventive care for IBD patients.

PMID: 30746631 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30746631?dopt=Abstract