Real-world Effectiveness of Advanced Therapies Among Patients With Moderate to Severe Ulcerative Colitis in the United States.

Real-world Effectiveness of Advanced Therapies Among Patients With Moderate to Severe Ulcerative Colitis in the United States.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019 Sep 27;:

Authors: Long MD, Smith TW, Dibonaventura M, Gruben D, Bargo D, Salese L, Quirk D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Ulcerative colitis (UC) treatment aims to induce response and maintain steroid-free remission. For patients with moderate to severe UC and/or nonresponse to conventional treatment, advanced therapies (immunosuppressants and biologics) are available. We assessed real-world effectiveness of advanced UC therapies.
METHODS: This retrospective analysis of claims data included adult patients with UC initiating immunosuppressant or biologic therapy, with 12 months’ continuous enrollment pre- and postinitiation. Patients had no prescription for biologic therapy (and/or immunosuppressant if initiating immunosuppressant) in the previous 12 months. Proportion of patients remaining steroid-free (excluding 14-week tapering period), hospitalizations, and costs in the 12 months postinitiation were assessed.
RESULTS: In total, 3562 patients were included in the analysis. Most patients (83.0%) used steroids in the 12 months before initiating advanced therapy. Overall, 47.8% remained steroid-free after 12 months (excluding tapering). After adjusting for patient characteristics, remaining steroid-free was significantly more likely with infliximab (43.9%) than with adalimumab (39.4%; P < 0.05); golimumab (38.2%) and vedolizumab (41.4%) were not significantly different vs adalimumab. Overall, 12.2% of patients had a UC-related hospitalization within 12 months of initiation, with a mean (SD) total length of stay of 8.2 (8.9) days and no significant differences between biologic therapies. Mean, unadjusted, UC-related costs in the 12 months postinitiation were $42,579 and were similar between therapies.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with UC initiating advanced therapy frequently continued using steroids for at least a year. Some patients experienced extended UC-related hospitalizations, with high UC-related costs overall. This suggests an ongoing challenge in managing patients with moderate to severe UC.

PMID: 31560046 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31560046?dopt=Abstract