Phenotype and Clinical Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Co-Existent Celiac Disease.

Phenotype and Clinical Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Co-Existent Celiac Disease.

J Crohns Colitis. 2018 May 07;:

Authors: Tse CS, Deepak P, De La Fuente J, Bledsoe AC, Larson JJ, Murray JA, Papadakis KA

Abstract
Background and Aims: Inflammatory bowel diseases, principally Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease are among the most common immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We aim to elucidate the clinical course and outcomes of patients with concomitant inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, a unique population that remains scarcely studied to date.
Methods: A retrospective matched case-control study of adults with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease was performed at a tertiary referral institution in North America. Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier curves compared disease characteristics and clinical outcomes of the two groups.
Results: A total of 342 inflammatory bowel disease patients were included in this study, of which 114 had coexistent celiac disease and 228 did not. Patients with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease had higher rates of primary sclerosing cholangitis (19.3% vs 5.7%; odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-9.4; p<0.001), extensive ulcerative colitis (78.1% vs 59.0%; odds ratio, 2.8; 95% confidence interval 1.5-5.5, p=0.002), and family history of celiac disease (10.5% vs 3.5%; odds ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.2; p=0.01), compared to patients without concomitant celiac disease.
Conclusions: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease with concomitant celiac disease have unique phenotypic features compared to non-celiac inflammatory bowel disease, with higher risks for colitis-related hospitalizations, extensive colitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Increased recognition of coexistent IBD and celiac disease can prompt clinicians to investigate for concomitant disease sooner, particularly in patients with seemingly refractory disease.

PMID: 29741603 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29741603?dopt=Abstract