Opioid Use Is Associated With Higher Health Care Costs and Emergency Encounters in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Related Articles

Opioid Use Is Associated With Higher Health Care Costs and Emergency Encounters in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019 May 14;:

Authors: Alley K, Singla A, Afzali A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine opioid use among adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States and the impact of extended opioid use on emergency health care services and health care costs among patients.
METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using medical claims data from the Truven Health MarketScan research databases, consisting of patients across the United States with employer-based health insurance. Subjects with IBD were identified in 2009. The occurrence of an emergent encounter in 2010 and health care costs were assessed.
RESULTS: There were 76,171 subjects with 35,993 emergent encounters among the study population, for an overall rate of 0.47 per patient-year. However, these encounters were confined to 6.9% of patients overall. The median total charges per patient in 2010 were $5372. Extended opioid use in 2009 was associated with a higher odds of an emergent encounter in 2010 (odds ratio [OR], 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.67-1.98), higher incidence rate of emergent encounters (incidence rate ratio, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.91-2.24), and higher odds of being in the top quartile of cost in 2010 (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.79-2.02). Depression was a strong predictor of extended opioid use (OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 2.49-2.81; P < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Extended opioid use among patients with IBD is an important predictor of emergent encounters and is associated with higher total health care costs. Psychosocial comorbidities are significant predictors of extended opioid use in patients with IBD.

PMID: 31087042 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31087042?dopt=Abstract