Novel Leucocyte/Thrombocyte Apheresis for Induction of Steroid-Free Remission in Ulcerative Colitis: A Controlled Randomized Pilot Study.

Related Articles

Novel Leucocyte/Thrombocyte Apheresis for Induction of Steroid-Free Remission in Ulcerative Colitis: A Controlled Randomized Pilot Study.

J Crohns Colitis. 2019 Mar 13;:

Authors: Kruis W, Nguyen P, Morgenstern J, Ramlow W, Dignaß A, Stallmach A, Drebber U

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In active ulcerative colitis [UC] refractory to mesalazine, escalation to either steroids or immunosuppression is common practice. The efficacy and safety of alternative escalation therapy with a novel leukocyte apheresis device were studied.
METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, controlled multicentre pilot study comparing leukocyte apheresis with prednisolone in refractory UC (disease activity index [DAI] ≥ 4 and ≤8). Group A received weekly apheresis over five consecutive weeks. Group P received oral prednisolone 40 mg/day tapered to 0 mg at week 6. The primary end point was steroid-free clinical remission [DAI ≤ 2] at week 12. Clinical response was also analysed.
RESULTS: Twenty-four patients were enrolled, 13 of whom were randomized into group A and 11 into group P. Clinical remission off steroids at week 12 was achieved in 3/12 patients [25.0%] with apheresis and 2/10 [20.0%] with prednisolone [p = 1.0]. The response rate after 12 weeks was 75.0% in group A and 50.0% in group P. Mean DAI scores improved in both treatment groups [p = 0.008]. C-reactive protein decreased from 6.0 ± 5.3 to 3.8 ± 3.7 mg/L at 12 weeks in group A and increased from 5.2 ± 6.0 to 6.3 ± 7.9 mg/mL in group P. Both treatments were well tolerated. No unexpected serious adverse events were seen in group A. In group P one symptomatic infection with Clostridium difficile occurred.
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with active UC refractory to mesalazine a novel leukocyte apheresis showed promising results. A comparison with prednisolone revealed similar therapeutic effectivity and excellent safety, providing the chance to escalate without systemic steroids.
CIV-12-01-003581.

PMID: 30863856 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30863856?dopt=Abstract