Inflammatory Pouch Conditions Are Common After Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis in Ulcerative Colitis Patients.

Inflammatory Pouch Conditions Are Common After Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis in Ulcerative Colitis Patients.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019 Oct 06;:

Authors: Kayal M, Plietz M, Rizvi A, Radcliffe M, Riggs A, Yzet C, Tixier E, Trivedi P, Ungaro RC, Khaitov S, Sylla P, Greenstein A, Frederic Colombel J, Dubinsky MC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Total proctocolectomy (TPC) with ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the gold standard surgery for ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with medically refractory disease. The aim of this study was to report the rates and risk factors of inflammatory pouch conditions.
METHODS: This was a retrospective review of UC or IBD unspecified (IBDU) patients who underwent TPC with IPAA for refractory disease or dysplasia between 2008 and 2017. Pouchoscopy data were used to calculate rates of inflammatory pouch conditions. Factors associated with outcomes in univariable analysis were investigated in multivariable analysis.
RESULTS: Of the 621 patients more than 18 years of age who underwent TPC with IPAA between January 2008 and December 2017, pouchoscopy data were available for 386 patients during a median follow-up period of 4 years. Acute pouchitis occurred in 205 patients (53%), 60 of whom (30%) progressed to chronic pouchitis. Cuffitis and Crohn’s disease-like condition (CDLC) of the pouch occurred in 119 (30%) patients and 46 (12%) patients, respectively. In multivariable analysis, female sex was associated with a decreased risk of acute pouchitis, and pre-operative steroid use and medically refractory disease were associated with an increased risk; IBDU was associated with chronic pouchitis; rectal cuff length ≥2 cm and medically refractory disease were associated with cuffitis; age 45-54 at colectomy was associated with CDLC. Rates of pouch failure were similar in chronic pouchitis and CDLC patients treated with biologics and those who were not.
CONCLUSIONS: Inflammatory pouch conditions are common. Biologic use for chronic pouchitis and CDLC does not impact the rate of pouch failure.

PMID: 31587035 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31587035?dopt=Abstract