Hydrodynamic IL10 Gene Transfer in Human Colon: Results from an “EX VIVO” Study with Potential Clinical Application in Crohn’s Disease.

Hydrodynamic IL10 Gene Transfer in Human Colon: Results from an “EX VIVO” Study with Potential Clinical Application in Crohn’s Disease.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017 Jul 12;:

Authors: Frasson M, Sendra L, Miguel A, Herrero MJ, Montalvá E, López-Andújar R, Martínez-Pastor J, Martí-Bonmatí L, Granero EG, Aliño S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of hydrodynamic venous IL10 gene delivery to “ex vivo” human colon segments and to determine its potential interest in Crohn’s disease treatment.
METHODS: Twenty human colon segments were obtained from surgical resections. Hydrodynamic transfection through the main vein of the pedicle with 50 mL of hIL10 plasmid (20 μg/mL) solution was performed on 13 of them. Tissue sections were cultured and DNA, RNA, and protein copies were determined after 1, 2, and 4 days. Data obtained were compared with 6 nontransfected specimens. Finally, 1 specimen was injected with gold nanoparticles, and their distribution was examined under electron microscope.
RESULTS: IL10 DNA levels were higher in treated tissues than in controls (P < 0.001), decreasing along time. The amount of hIL10 RNA was significantly increased in treated tissues when compared with controls (P = 0.001). The indexes of protein IL10 translation in treated groups were much higher (P < 0.001) than the basal production. The protein expression was higher in transfected tissue (10-50-fold, with respect to control tissue); this difference being established during the first hours and maintained during, at least, 4 days. With electron microscopy, we hardly observed large (15 nm) gold nanoparticles within the tissue, always in the submucosa. However, multiple small (4 nm) nanoparticles were observed within the cytoplasm of enterocytes in mucosa.
CONCLUSIONS: Hydrodynamic procedure efficiently delivers the IL10 gene to the human colon, achieving levels of tissue protein expression high enough to mediate pharmacological effects with interest in controlling immune response in patients with Crohn’s disease.

PMID: 28708803 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28708803?dopt=Abstract