Fecal Lactoferrin for Assessment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Fecal Lactoferrin for Assessment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Clin Gastroenterol. 2019 Apr 15;:

Authors: Dai C, Jiang M, Sun MJ, Cao Q

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Persistent disease activity is associated with a poor prognosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Therefore, monitoring of IBD activity can avoid the poor prognosis. Serum biomarkers reflect a summation of systemic host responses rather than being specific for intestinal inflammation. And endoscopic monitoring is invasive, costly, and time consuming. The objective of our study was to perform a meta-analysis evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of fecal lactoferrin (FL) in assessing IBD activity.
METHODS: We systematically searched the databases from inception to May 2018 that evaluated IBD activity. The methodological quality of each study was assessed according to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies checklist. The extracted data were pooled using a summary receiver operating characteristic curve model. Random-effects model was used to summarize the diagnostic odds ratio, sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio.
RESULTS: Ten studies comprising 773 IBD patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity values for assessing ulcerative colitis (UC) activity were 0.81 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.92] and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.61-0.93), respectively. And the pooled sensitivity and specificity values for assessing Crohn’s disease (CD) activity were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.73-0.88) and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.63-0.78), respectively. The diagnostic performance of the FL assay in the UC patients appeared to be superior to that in the CD patients.
CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis has found that FL is an inexpensive, simple, stable, and useful screening marker with high sensitivity and modest specificity for assessing IBD activity, appearing to have greater ability to evaluate UC rather than CD.

PMID: 30994521 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30994521?dopt=Abstract