Effect of Faecal Microbiota Transplantation for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

Effect of Faecal Microbiota Transplantation for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

J Crohns Colitis. 2018 Mar 08;:

Authors: Chen T, Zhou Q, Zhang D, Jiang F, Wu J, Zhou JY, Zheng X, Chen YG

Abstract
Background: Evidence concerning the effect of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been firmly established. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate FMT treatment outcomes in patients with IBD treated for CDI.
Methods: An electronic search of four databases was conducted until November 1st, 2017. Cohort studies of FMT efficacy and safety in CDI patients with IBD were included. Pooled effect sizes were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a random-effects model.
Results: Nine cohort studies comprising a total of 346 CDI patients with IBD were included. The initial cure rate was 81% (95% CI = 76% – 85%) and the overall cure rate was up to 89% (95% CI = 83% – 93%), both with no significant heterogeneity. The recurrence rate was 19% (95% CI = 13% – 27%) with moderate heterogeneity (Cochran’s Q, P = 0.19; I2 = 33%). There was no significant difference in the CDI cure rate after FMT in patients with and without IBD (RR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.81 – 1.05; Cochran’s Q, P = 0.06; I2 = 53%). Subgroup analysis revealed a similar CDI treatment effect after FMT in patients with Crohn’s disease and those with ulcerative colitis (p = 0.1804). Four studies reported adverse events of IBD flares.
Conclusions: FMT is an effective therapy for CDI in patients with IBD. Well-designed randomised controlled trials and well-conducted microbiological studies are needed to validate its efficacy and safety.

PMID: 29528385 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29528385?dopt=Abstract