Delayed Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis Has a Lower 30-Day Adverse Event Rate: Analysis From the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

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Delayed Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis Has a Lower 30-Day Adverse Event Rate: Analysis From the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2018 Apr 25;:

Authors: Kochar B, Barnes EL, Peery AF, Cools KS, Galanko J, Koruda M, Herfarth HH

Abstract
Background: Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients requiring colectomy often have a staged ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). There are no prospective data comparing timing of pouch creation. We aimed to compare 30-day adverse event rates for pouch creation at the time of colectomy (PTC) with delayed pouch creation (DPC).
Methods: Using prospectively collected data from 2011-2015 through the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, we conducted a cohort study including subjects aged ≥18 years with a postoperative diagnosis of UC. We assessed 30-day postoperative rates of unplanned readmissions, reoperations, and major and minor adverse events (AEs), comparing the stage of the surgery where the pouch creation took place. Using a modified Poisson regression model, we estimated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking status, diabetes, albumin, and comorbidities.
Results: Of 2390 IPAA procedures, 1571 were PTC and 819 were DPC. In the PTC group, 51% were on chronic immunosuppression preoperatively, compared with 15% in the DPC group (P < 0.01). After controlling for confounders, patients who had DPC were significantly less likely to have unplanned reoperations (RR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.24-0.75), major AEs (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52-0.99), and minor AEs (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.32-0.73) than PTC.
Conclusions: Patients undergoing delayed pouch creation were at lower risk for unplanned reoperations and major and minor adverse events compared with patients undergoing pouch creation at the time of colectomy. 10.1093/ibd/izy082_video1izy082.video15776112442001.

PMID: 29697787 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29697787?dopt=Abstract