Decreasing Risk of First and Subsequent Surgeries in Patients With Crohn’s Disease in England From 1994 through 2013.

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Decreasing Risk of First and Subsequent Surgeries in Patients With Crohn’s Disease in England From 1994 through 2013.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Dec 21;:

Authors: Burr NE, Lord R, Hull MA, Subramanian V

Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastrointestinal (GI) surgery is an important part of the treatment algorithm for patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) that is complicated or does not respond to medical therapy. Cohort studies from Denmark and Canada have shown that the risk of primary surgery is decreasing but there is a lack of contemporary data on subsequent resections. We examined trends in first and second GI resections in patients with CD.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study using the United Kingdom primary care database ResearchOne, collecting data from patients with Crohn’s disease from 1994 through 2013. We compared rates of first and second GI resections with etiological factors.
RESULTS: Among 3059 incident cases of CD, 13%, 21%, and 26% of the patients underwent surgical resections after 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Of patients with an initial resection, 20% required an additional operation when followed for 10 years after the initial resection. We found a significant reduction in first surgery, from 44% to 21% after 10 years of disease, from 1994 to 2003 (2 for trend, P<.05). There was a significant reduction in second resections, in a 10-year follow-up period, from 40% in 1994 to 17% in 2003 (2 for trend, P<.05). Duration of disease, younger age at diagnosis, smoking, and immunomodulator use were positively associated with first surgeries. Duration of disease was significantly associated with the risk of undergoing a second resection.
CONCLUSION: In a retrospective analysis of a United Kingdom primary care database, we observed a significant reduction in first and subsequent GI surgeries among patients with CD over the past 20 years in England.

PMID: 30583051 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30583051?dopt=Abstract