Cost-effectiveness and Clinical Outcomes of Early Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Intervention in Pediatric Crohn’s Disease.

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Cost-effectiveness and Clinical Outcomes of Early Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Intervention in Pediatric Crohn’s Disease.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019 Nov 15;:

Authors: Bashir NS, Walters TD, Griffiths AM, Ito S, Ungar WJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) treatments are increasingly used to treat pediatric Crohn’s disease, even without a prior trial of immunomodulators, but the cost-effectiveness of such treatment algorithms has not been formally examined. Drug plan decision-makers require evidence of cost-effectiveness to inform funding decisions. The objective was to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness of early intervention with anti-TNF-α treatment vs a conventional step-up strategy per steroid-free remission-week gained from public health care and societal payer perspectives over 3 years.
METHODS: A probabilistic microsimulation model was constructed for children with newly diagnosed moderate to severe Crohn’s disease receiving anti-TNF-α treatment and concomitant treatments within the first 3 months of diagnosis compared with children receiving standard care consisting of steroids and/or immunomodulators with the possibility of anti-TNF-α treatment after 3 months of diagnosis. A North American multicenter observational study with 360 patients provided input into clinical outcomes and health care resource use.
RESULTS: Early intervention with anti-TNF-α treatment was more costly, with an incremental cost of CAD$31,112 (95% confidence interval [CI], $2939-$91,715), and more effective, with 11.3 more weeks in steroid-free remission (95% CI, 10.6-11.6) compared with standard care, resulting in an incremental cost per steroid-free remission-week gained of CAD$2756 from an Ontario public health care perspective and CAD$2968 from a societal perspective. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was sensitive to the price of infliximab.
CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that although early anti-TNF-α was not cost-effective, it was clinically beneficial. These findings, along with other randomized controlled trial evidence, may inform formulary decision-making.

PMID: 31728510 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31728510?dopt=Abstract