Corticosteroid Treatment at Diagnosis: An Analysis of Relapses, Disease Extension, and Colectomy Rate in Ulcerative Colitis.

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Corticosteroid Treatment at Diagnosis: An Analysis of Relapses, Disease Extension, and Colectomy Rate in Ulcerative Colitis.

Dig Dis Sci. 2019 Nov 21;:

Authors: Bertani L, Bodini G, Mumolo MG, de Bortoli N, Ceccarelli L, Frazzoni L, Tapete G, Albano E, Plaz Torres MC, Bellini M, Savarino E, Savarino V, Marchi S, Costa F

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Ulcerative colitis is a chronic relapsing disease usually treated with mesalamine. The need of steroid therapy at diagnosis is generally considered as a poor prognostic factor.
AIMS: The aim of our study was to assess whether patients treated with corticosteroids at diagnosis have more clinical relapses, disease progression, or an increased risk of colectomy during a 5-year follow-up.
METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated patients who had received diagnosis of ulcerative colitis with a 5-year follow-up. Relapse was defined as a worsening of symptoms requiring an increase in medical treatment. Progression of disease was defined as a proximal extension of mucosal involvement, comparing the colonoscopy performed 5 years after diagnosis with the first one. The need of corticosteroid treatment at diagnosis was correlated to number of relapses, disease progression, and colectomy rate.
RESULTS: We included 230 patients, 116 of them (50%) treated with steroids at diagnosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that there is a strong correlation between corticosteroid use and number of relapses (p < 0.01), as well as with disease progression (p < 0.05). Seventeen patients (7.4%) underwent colectomy, but the correlation with steroids was not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS: These data provide evidence that the need of corticosteroids at diagnosis is associated with a worse clinical outcome.

PMID: 31754992 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31754992?dopt=Abstract