Corticosteroid Sparing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease is More Often Achieved in the Immunomodulator and Biological Era-Results from the Dutch Population-Based IBDSL Cohort.

Corticosteroid Sparing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease is More Often Achieved in the Immunomodulator and Biological Era-Results from the Dutch Population-Based IBDSL Cohort.

Am J Gastroenterol. 2018 Jan 09;:

Authors: Jeuring SFG, Biemans VBC, van den Heuvel TRA, Zeegers MP, Hameeteman WH, Romberg-Camps MJL, Oostenbrug LE, Masclee AAM, Jonkers DMAE, Pierik MJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Corticosteroid-free remission is an emerging treatment goal in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the population-based Inflammatory Bowel Disease South Limburg cohort, we studied temporal changes in corticosteroid use and assessed the corticosteroid-sparing effects of immunomodulators and biologicals in real life.
METHODS: In total, 2,823 newly diagnosed patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) were included. Corticosteroid exposure and cumulative days of use were compared between patients diagnosed in 1991-1998 (CD: n=316, UC: n=539), 1999-2005 (CD: n=387, UC: n=527), and 2006-2011 (CD: n=459, UC: n=595). Second, the corticosteroid-sparing effects of immunomodulators and biologicals were assessed.
RESULTS: Over time, the corticosteroid exposure rate was stable (54.0% in CD and 31.4% in UC), even as the cumulative corticosteroid use in the first disease year (CD: 83 days (interquartile range (IQR) 35-189), UC: 62 days (IQR 0-137)). On the long-term, a gradual decrease in cumulative corticosteroid use was seen in CD (era ’91-’98: 366 days (IQR 107-841), era ’06-’11: 120 days (IQR 72-211), P<0.01), whereas in UC an initial decrease was observed (era ’91-’98: 184 days (IQR 86-443), era ’99-’05: 166 days (IQR 74-281), P=0.03), and stabilization thereafter. Immunomodulator and biological users had a lower risk of requiring corticosteroids than matched controls in CD only (33.6% vs. 49.9%, P<0.01, and 25.7% vs. 38.2%, P=0.04, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS: In a real-world setting, more recently diagnosed IBD patients used lower amounts of corticosteroids as of the second year of disease. For CD, a significant association was found with the use of immunomodulators and biologicals. These conclusions support the increasing use of these treatment modalities.Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 9 January 2018; doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.482.

PMID: 29317770 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29317770?dopt=Abstract