Clinically Significant Small Bowel Crohn’s Disease Might Only be Detected by Capsule Endoscopy.

Clinically Significant Small Bowel Crohn’s Disease Might Only be Detected by Capsule Endoscopy.

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2018 Jun 08;24(7):1566-1574

Authors: Sorrentino D, Nguyen VQ

Abstract
Background: In Crohn’s disease (CD) a small bowel study-in addition to colonoscopy-is considered necessary for diagnosis/staging. In this study we re-examined the role of capsule endoscopy (CE), colonoscopy, imaging tests [magnetic resonance enterography/computed tomographic enterography (MRE/CTE)], and inflammatory markers [fecal lactoferrin and C-reactive protein (FL/CRP)] in CD patients who had undergone intestinal resection and in those who never had surgery.
Methods: In this retrospective study 43 consecutive patients underwent CE because of staging/symptoms unexplained by colonoscopy/imaging. We compared colonoscopy, imaging, and FL/CRP with CE and evaluated the impact of the latter on clinical management and outcomes.
Results: In patients who never had surgery imaging was negative with a positive CE in 8/15 (53%) of cases. Colonoscopy was insufficient for disease staging in 10/20 (50%) cases. CRP and FL were normal with a positive CE in 35% and 28% of cases, respectively. CE findings changed the management in 6/20 (30%) of cases, with 83% showing clinical/biochemical improvement after up to 15 months of follow-up. In postoperative patients CE was positive with negative imaging in 6/8 (75%) cases. Colonoscopy was insufficient for disease staging in 13/22 (59%) cases. CRP and FL were normal in 42% and 31.8% of patients with positive CE. In these patients CE findings changed the management in 12/23 (52%) cases with 83% of them showing clinical/biochemical improvement after up to 18 months of follow-up.
Conclusions: Omitting CE from diagnostic/staging algorithms in CD tends to underdiagnose clinically significant small bowel lesions, thus impacting on patients’ management and outcomes. 10.1093/ibd/izy048_video1izy048.video15794820403001.

PMID: 29893950 [PubMed – in process]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29893950?dopt=Abstract