Evaluation of a multiplex PCR assay for detection of cytomegalovirus in stool samples from patients with ulcerative colitis.

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Evaluation of a multiplex PCR assay for detection of cytomegalovirus in stool samples from patients with ulcerative colitis.

World J Gastroenterol. 2015 Nov 28;21(44):12667-75

Authors: Nahar S, Iraha A, Hokama A, Uehara A, Parrott G, Ohira T, Kaida M, Kinjo T, Kinjo T, Hirata T, Kinjo N, Fujita J

Abstract
AIM: To evaluate a multiplex PCR assay for the detection of bacterial and viral enteropathogens in stool samples from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).
METHODS: We prospectively analyzed 300 individuals, including immunocompetent patients, immunocompromised patients, and patients with UC. Stool samples were collected from the recto-sigmoid region of the colon by endoscopy. The samples were qualitatively analyzed for bacterial and viral enteropathogens with a multiplex PCR assay using a Seeplex(®) Kit. Additional clinical and laboratory data were collected from the medical records.
RESULTS: A multiplex PCR assay detected 397 pathogens (191 bacteria and 206 viruses) in 215 samples (71.7%). The most frequently detected bacteria were Escherichia coli H7, 85 (28.3%); followed by Aeromonas spp., 43 (14.3%); and Clostridium perfringens, 36 (12.0%) samples. The most prevalent viruses were Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), 90 (30.0%); followed by human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6), 53 (17.7%); and cytomegalovirus (CMV), 37 (12.3%) samples. The prevalence rate of CMV infection was significantly higher in the immunocompromised group than in the immunocompetent group (P < 0.01). CMV infection was more common in patients with UC (26/71; 36.6%) than in the immunocompetent patients excluding UC (6/188; 3.2%) (P < 0.01). CMV infection was more prevalent in UC active patients (25/58; 43.1%) than in UC inactive patients (1/13; 7.7%) (P < 0.05). Among 4 groups which defined by the UC activity and immunosuppressive drugs, the prevalence rate of CMV infection was highest in the UC active patients with immunosuppressive drugs (19/34; 55.8%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection was more common in the immunocompromised patients excluding UC (18/41; 43.9%) than in the immunocompetent patients excluding UC (47/188; 25.0%) (P < 0.05). The simultaneous presence of CMV and EBV and/or HHV6 in UC active patients (14/58; 24.1%) was greater than in immunocompromised patients excluding UC (5/41; 12.2%) (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSION: The multiplex PCR assay that was used to analyze the stool samples in this study may serve as a non-invasive approach that can be used to exclude the possibility of CMV infection in patients with active UC who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

PMID: 26640344 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26640344?dopt=Abstract