Evidence to Support Monitoring of Vedolizumab Trough Concentrations in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

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Evidence to Support Monitoring of Vedolizumab Trough Concentrations in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Apr 25;:

Authors: Dreesen E, Verstockt B, Bian S, de Bruyn M, Compernolle G, Tops S, Noman M, Van Assche G, Ferrante M, Gils A, Vermeire S

Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Trough concentrations of vedolizumab were found to correlate with clinical response in phase 3 studies of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). Nevertheless, there are no solid data to support monitoring of vedolizumab trough concentrations in treated patients. We investigated the correlation between vedolizumab exposure and response in a real-world population and aimed to identify patient factors that affect exposure and response.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 179 consecutive patients (66 with UC and 113 with CD) who began vedolizumab therapy from September 1, 2015 through October 1, 2016 at University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium. Serum concentrations of vedolizumab were measured before all infusions up to week 30. Effectiveness endpoints included endoscopic healing (UC, Mayo endoscopic sub-score ≤1; CD, absence of ulcers), clinical response (physicians’ global assessment), and biologic response or remission (based on level of C-reactive protein) and were assessed at week 14 (for patients with UC) and week 22 (for patients with CD). A stepwise forward addition-backward elimination modeling approach was performed to identify factors independently associated with vedolizumab exposure and response.
RESULTS: Vedolizumab trough concentrations >30.0 μg/mL at week 2, >24.0 μg/mL at week 6, and >14.0 μg/mL during maintenance therapy associated with a higher probability of attaining the effectiveness endpoints for patients with UC or CD (P<.05). Higher body mass and more severe disease (based on high level of C-reactive protein and low level of albumin and/or hemoglobin) at the start of vedolizumab therapy associated with lower trough concentrations of vedolizumab over the 30-week period and a lower probability of achieving mucosal healing (P<.05). Mucosal healing was achieved in significantly more patients with UC than patients with CD, even though a diagnosis of UC was not an independent predictor of higher vedolizumab trough concentrations.
CONCLUSION: In a retrospective study of 179 patients with CD or UC, we observed a correlation between vedolizumab exposure and response. These findings support monitoring of vedolizumab trough concentrations to predict patients’ outcome.

PMID: 29704680 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29704680?dopt=Abstract