Patient-Reported Outcomes of Quality of Life, Functioning, and GI/Psychiatric Symptom Severity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

Patient-Reported Outcomes of Quality of Life, Functioning, and GI/Psychiatric Symptom Severity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2017 Mar 15;:

Authors: IsHak WW, Pan D, Steiner AJ, Feldman E, Mann A, Mirocha J, Danovitch I, Melmed GY

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at risk for psychiatric disorders that impact symptom experience and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Therefore, comprehensive biopsychosocial assessments should be considered in ambulatory care settings. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) measures created by the National Institutes of Health have shown construct validity in a large IBD internet-based cohort, but their validity in ambulatory settings has not been examined. We sought to validate PROMIS patient-reported measures of HRQOL, functioning, and psychiatric symptom severity at a tertiary IBD clinic.
METHODS: Adult patients (n = 110) completed the PROMIS Global Health scale, PROMIS-29, SF-12, and WHODAS 2.0. Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) determined the relationships between scores to validate the PROMIS Global Health Physical and Mental metrics, compared with the SF-12 and WHODAS 2.0. We compared these measures by disease subtype of Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.
RESULTS: PROMIS measures were highly correlated (r range = 0.64-0.82) with standard measures of HRQOL and functioning. On the PROMIS Global Health measures, 20.9% had impaired physical health, and 13.7% had impaired mental health. Impairments were reported in pain interference (20% of patients), anxiety (18.2%), satisfaction with social role (15.5%), physical functioning (10.9%), fatigue (10%), depression (7.3%), and sleep disturbance (5.5%). Patients with Crohn’s disease had worse scores than those with ulcerative colitis on measures of the global physical health (P = 0.027), physical functioning (P = 0.047), and pain interference (P = 0.0009).
CONCLUSIONS: PROMIS instruments provide valid assessment of HRQOL and functioning in ambulatory adults with IBD. Of note, patients with Crohn’s disease demonstrated significantly worse impairments than those with ulcerative colitis.

PMID: 28301432 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

PubMed Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28301432?dopt=Abstract